Fighting Polio And Poverty, This Anantapur Youth Now Eyes To Represent India At Paralympics 2024

Image Credits: The New Indian Express

The Logical Indian Crew

Fighting Polio And Poverty, This Anantapur Youth Now Eyes To Represent India At Paralympics 2024

V M Kishore Kumar was diagnosed with polio when he was five years old. He had a tough childhood as he needed support to move till he passed his 6th standard.

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Living life with a disability is an uphill task for most people but for some, it is just a state of mind. For V M Kishore Kumar, it has been all about courage and determination. Since childhood, Kumar had constantly been mocked and turned away for being differently-abled. But now, he has achieved something which most of the able-bodied-persons could not accomplish.

Today, Kumar is not only a successful gym trainer and former 'Mister Rayalaseema', but has also set his eyes on the next goal—to represent India at Paris Paralympics, 2024, The New Indian Express reported.

Poor Family Background

Kumar was born and brought up in Anantapur, Andhra Pradesh, and comes from an impoverished background. His father is a lorry driver at Hamali Colony and his mother is a housemaker. At the age of five, he was diagnosed with polio. He had a tough childhood as he needed support to move till he passed his 6th standard. Later, he used to move with the help of crutches and struggled through tough days to earn a Master's Degree.

His interest in body-building started when he was studying in Class 10. Presently, he has a toned and muscular body like most of the regular gym-goers.

When A Trainer Made Fun Of Him

Initially, he used to work out at home and later started going to the nearby Arts College ground for training. Kumar recalled how the trainer there made fun of him when he enquired about the money to be paid to practise at the ground. "The trainer looked around and asked who wanted training. He poked fun at me when I told him it's me," he said, as quoted by The New Indian Express.

"Next day I went to the Police Training College (PTC), where other youths were jogging. I thought tracksuit was mandatory to there and didn't enter," he added. Kumar used to visit the PTC on a daily basis and would watch others practise from outside.

He was observed by one of the senior officers, who later permitted him to practise on the ground. During this period, he started looking forward to the 2001 body-building championship for the disabled. "In 2002, I bagged the first position at the district-level and went on to become Mister Rayalaseema in 2003," he said while speaking to the publication.

He also stood first in the tricycle competition, which impressed the Rural Development Trust (RDT) director Moncho Ferrer. When the RDT started a gym at its village, Kumar attended the interview for the post of a coach and got selected.

Also Read: Heartening! Judge Steps Out Of Courtroom To Award Compensation To Paralysed Person In Chhattisgarh


Contributors Suggest Correction
Writer : Tashafi Nazir
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Editor : Palak Agrawal
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Creatives : Tashafi Nazir

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