Twitter Calls For Judicial Review Of Indian Content Takedown Orders: Report

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The Logical Indian Crew

Twitter Calls For Judicial Review Of Indian Content Takedown Orders: Report

In a filing with the top court in Karnataka, Twitter claimed that some removal orders fell short of the procedural conditions of the country's IT Act, the report revealed, without pinpointing which ones it wanted to be reviewed.

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Twitter has asked an Indian court on July 5 to overturn a few of the government orders to take down content from the microblogging platform, a source close to the matter claimed, in a legal challenge alleging abuse of power by officials.

The U.S. media company's attempt to obtain a judicial review of the orders can be seen as a part of a growing confrontation with New Delhi.

What Is Twitter's Appeal Against?

Twitter has been requested by Indian authorities in the past year to act on content that includes accounts which support an independent Sikh state, posts of which reportedly have spread misinformation regarding protests by farmers and tweets vital to the government's handling of the COVID pandemic.

"Be it any company, in any sector, they should abide by the laws of India," India's IT minister Ashwini Vaishnaw was quoted as saying by Reuters in a report.

The PM Modi government had earlier stated that big social media companies, including Twitter, were yet to comply with removal requests, in spite of their legal standing.

In June, the IT ministry warned the microblogging platform of criminal proceedings if it did not comply with some of the legal orders. This week, the source revealed that Twitter complied with the orders so as not to lose liability exemptions available as a host of content.

Centre VS Twitter

In a filing with the top court in Karnataka, Twitter claimed that some removal orders fell short of the procedural conditions of the country's IT Act, the report revealed, without pinpointing which ones it wanted to be reviewed.

The IT act permits the Indian government to block public access to posts in the interest of national security, among a few other reasons.

Twitter's market research firm states it has almost 24 million users in India and also argues in its filing that a few of the orders failed to give notice to the authors of the content.

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