Cancer Linked To Use Of Tobacco Highest In Northeast: Report

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Cancer Linked To Use Of Tobacco Highest In Northeast: Report

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Mizoram’s capital, Aizawl, reported the highest cancer cases among men in the country with an incidence rate of 269.4 per one lakh population.

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Cancers related to the use of tobacco is highest in the North East region of India, said the National Cancer Registry Programme report for 2020 released by The Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) and National Centre for Disease Informatics and Research (NCDIR), Bengaluru on Tuesday, August 18.

The report said that tobacco-related cancers are estimated to contribute 3.7 lakh or 27.1 per cent of the total cancer burden in 2020. The study estimated that by 2020, the number of cancer cases in the country will be at 13.9 lakh, and by 2025, it is likely to increase to 15.7 lakh based on current trends.

Between 2012 to 2016, North East recorded the highest cancer incidence rate in the country. Mizoram's capital, Aizawl, reported the highest cancer cases among men with an incidence rate of 269.4 per one lakh population.

Aizawl was followed by Meghalaya's East Khasi Hills district with an incidence rate of 227.9 per one lakh population and Assam's Kamrup (Metro) with 213 cancer cases per one lakh population.

Meanwhile, among women, the highest cancer cases in the country were reported in Papumpare district in Arunachal Pradesh, with an incidence rate of 219.8 per one lakh population. Further, Kamrup (Metro) reported the fourth highest cases in the category with 170 cancer cases per one lakh population.

Further, while East Khasi Hills district reported the highest proportion of tobacco cancer with 71 per cent in men and 47 per cent in women, Assam reported tobacco-related cancers for men at 52 per cent and about 22 per cent for women.

"Most registries in North Eastern region showed more male preponderance in risk, whereas registries other than North Eastern showed more female preponderance in risk," the report said.

It added that while the cancer of lung, mouth, stomach and oesophagus were the most common among men, cancer of the breast, cervix uteri were most common among women.

"Northeast is way ahead of the rest of India for cancer incidences. Closest in men is Delhi at 147 and Bengaluru for women at 141. We are at the top with 200+ cases for both. High consumption of tobacco is the biggest reason behind this," Manigreeva Krishnatreya, medical officer at BBCI told The Times Of India.

The report is based on information related to cancer collected from 28 Population-Based Cancer Registries (PBCRs). In addition, 58 Hospital Based Cancer Registries (HBCRs) also provided cancer data.

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