Communal Harmony: Kerala Church Opens Its Gates For Cremation Of Hindu Woman

For the second time, authorities of St George Forane Church made arrangements in their cemetery to conduct the cremation of a Hindu woman in the water-logged Kuttanad region.

Kerala   |   15 July 2021 6:40 AM GMT
Writer : Zara Antoinette Kennedy | Editor : Palak Agrawal | Creatives : Palak Agrawal
Communal Harmony: Kerala Church Opens Its Gates For Cremation Of Hindu Woman

A Christain Church allowed the cremation of a Hindu woman on its premises in Kerala's Kuttanad region. The church had made arrangements for such a ritual for the second time, setting an example of communal harmony.

The authorities of St George Forane Church, Edathua, allowed the family members to cremate the body of 85-year-old Krishnaveni, who had died due to age-related illnesses on Tuesday, July 13.

According to The New Indian Express, the Church had, earlier in the month, allowed the cremation of Krishnaveni's husband who has succumbed to COVID-19.

Monsoons: A Roadblock To Cremation Rituals

"Her family has less than five cents and the house premises are underwater. Hence, grama panchayat member Babu Mathuruthy contacted church authorities and vicar Fr Mathew Chooravadi who allowed the body to be cremated in the cemetery. He had also allowed the cremation of her husband in the cemetery last month," Ajithkumar Pisharath, member of the block panchayat told The New Indian Express.

Adequate arrangements were made for the cremation by church vicar Fr Mathew, trustee K M Mathew Thakazhiyil, parish committee member Bibil Mathew Kandathil, and Alex Manjummal.

In the Kuttanad region, several families have faced problems in cremating the bodies of their loved ones owing to the flooding of their houses in the monsoons. Some of them resort to erecting funeral pyres on a platform made by tying plantain trees together on the water.


Kerala Muslim Woman Cremator Sets An Example

In yet another story from Kerela, a Muslim woman crematorium manager was in the news a month ago overseeing funeral procedures.

Subina Rahman set aside her priorities to give the deceased a decent send-off. When families and priests are unable to perform the last rituals, Rahman not only lights the funeral pyres but also consoles the bereaved and recites a prayer or two for them.

"For ages, women have been kept away from ministering to the deceased," Rahman said, reported The Wire. "My job is allowing me to serve Hindu and Christian families,'' she added.

Also Read: 2,800 Men For 200 Women: Kerala Church Opens Site To Help Widows, Middle-Aged Men Find Life Partners


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Contributors

Zara Antoinette Kennedy

Zara Antoinette Kennedy

Remote Intern

I am an aspiring journalist with an avid appreciation for the law and a chutzpah that's only seen in admirers of these disciplines. I am currently pursuing a triple major in English, Journalism, and Psychology.

Palak Agrawal

Palak Agrawal

Digital Editor

Palak a journalism graduate believes in simplifying the complicated and writing about the extraordinary lives of ordinary people. She calls herself a " hodophile" or in layman words- a person who loves to travel.

Palak Agrawal

Palak Agrawal

Digital Editor

Palak a journalism graduate believes in simplifying the complicated and writing about the extraordinary lives of ordinary people. She calls herself a " hodophile" or in layman words- a person who loves to travel.

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