'No Violations In Rafale Deal With India', Says Dassault Aviation, Rejects Claims Of Paying Middleman

"Since the early 2000s, Dassault Aviation has implemented strict internal procedures to prevent corruption, guaranteeing the integrity, ethics and reputation of the company in its industrial and commercial relations," Dassault aviation said in a statement.

India   |   9 April 2021 7:35 AM GMT
Writer : Navya Singh | Editor : Shweta Kothari | Creatives : Abhishek M
No Violations In Rafale Deal With India, Says Dassault Aviation, Rejects Claims Of Paying Middleman

Image Credit: The Indian Express

French jet maker Dassault Aviation, the makers of Rafale, on April 8, said that the deal to supply 36 fighter jets went through multiple checks and no violations were reported.

The company also said that it implemented stringent internal procedures to prevent corruption, reported Hindustan Times.

"Numerous controls are carried out by official organizations, including the French Anti-Corruption Agency. No violations were reported, notably in the frame of the contract with India for the acquisition of 36 Rafales," Dassault aviation said in a statement.

The statement came in response to allegations that have surfaced in the media about the contract signed in 2016 with India.

"Since the early 2000s, Dassault Aviation has implemented strict internal procedures to prevent corruption, guaranteeing the integrity, ethics and reputation of the company in its industrial and commercial relations. In the context of the Sapin 2 law, the company has completed and strengthened its system for the prevention and detection of corruption and influence peddling, both at the level of the parent company and its subsidiaries," the statement read.

"The contract with India for the acquisition of 36 Rafales has been established on a government-to-government basis. This contract, as well as the offsets corresponding contract, meet the criteria established by these regulations and are being executed in full transparency between the various government and industrial partners," it added.

The Narendra Modi government signed a ₹59,000-crore deal on September 23, 2016 to get 36 Rafale jets from Dassault Aviation. The deal was seen as India's major defence acquisition of fighter jets in over two decades.

After the deal, the Congress raised several questions about the deal, including on rates of the aircraft and alleged corruption charges. The opposition claimed that PM Modi acted as a middleman in the deal.

The Supreme Court and government's top auditor, Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG), also could not find any corruption in the deal.

The controversy, however, was reignited last week after a French media journal, Mediapart, claimed that Dassault Aviation paid €1 million to a Sushen Gupta, describing him as a "middleman", in connection with the Rafale jets.

Also Read: Rafale Controversy: Indian Firm Denies Irregularities After French Media Report Claims €1 Mn Paid To Middleman In Deal

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