Conversation Between A Major And A Nurse

The Logical Indian

September 17th, 2015 / 5:21 PM

Source : Deepak Chandan's Profile | Image Courtesy : twimg

 

The on-duty nurse took the anxious young Major to the bedside.
“Your son is here,” she said softly, to the old man lying there.
She had to repeat the words several times before the patient’s eyes opened.
Heavily sedated because of the pain of his heart attack, he dimly saw the young uniformed Major standing outside the oxygen tent.
He reached out his hand.
The Major wrapped his toughened fingers around the old man’s limp ones, squeezing a message of love and encouragement.
The nurse, observing the touching moments, brought a chair so that the Major could sit beside the bed.
“Thank you Ma’am!” a polite acknowledgement followed.
All through the night the young Major sat there in the poorly lit ward, holding the old man’s hand and offering him words of love and strength. Occasionally, the nurse suggested that the officer move away and rest awhile.
He graciously refused.
Whenever the nurse came into the ward, he was oblivious of her and of the night noises of the hospital – the clanking of the oxygen tank, the laughter of the night staff members exchanging greetings, the cries and moans of the other patients.
Now and then she heard him say a few gentle words. The dying man said nothing, only held tightly to his son all through the night.
Along towards dawn, the old man died. The Major released the now lifeless hand he had been holding and went to tell the nurse.
While she did what she had to do, he waited,

Finally, she returned,- & started to offer words of sympathy, but the Major interrupted her.
“Who was that man?” he asked.

The nurse was startled,
“He was your father,” she answered.
“No, he wasn’t,” the Major replied.
“I never saw him before in my life.”
“Then why didn’t you say something when I took you to him?”
“I knew right away there had been a mistake, but I also knew he needed his son, and his son just wasn’t here!”
The nurse listened on, confused.
“When I realized that he was too sick to tell whether or not I was his son, knowing how much he needed me, I stayed.”
“So then what was the purpose of your visit here, at the hospital, good sir?”, the nurse queried of him.
“I came here tonight to find a Mr. Vikram Salaria.
His son was Killed in J&K last night, and I was sent to inform him.”
‘But the man whose hand you kept holding whole night was Mr Vikram Salaria!’
They stood in complete silence. There couldn’t be anything more assuring for a dying man than his son’s hand!
The next time someone needs you, just be there!
&
Just stay!

We Are Not Human Beings Going Through A Temporary Spiritual Experience; We Are Spiritual Beings Going Through A Temporary Human Experience!


Contributors

Edited by :

Share your thoughts..

Related Stories

Human Library Kolkata

#Unjudge: Indulge In A Conversation With A Book At Kolkata’s First Human Library

It’s Not Hard to Make A Conversation. This World Senior Citizen Day, Let’s Try To Connect With Our Elders

Kerala Nurse Sacrifices Life To Treat Nipah-Infected Patients, Govt Announces Compensation

Chhattisgarh: From 7 Yrs, This Nurse Has Been Braving River Full Of Crocodiles To Treat Patients

In Conversation With George Abraham, Founder Of The World Blind Cricket Council

Flavia Agnes

From Law And Politics To Religion: In Conversation With Flavia Agnes

Latest on The Logical Indian

News

Plastic Ban: A Patchwork Of Good Intentions And Half-Hearted Implementation

Exclusive

Suspended Civil Servant Files Complaint After Twitter Trolls Issue Rape Threats To Wife

News

After India Bans PSL, Pakistan Stops Broadcast Of IPL Across Nation

News

Citing Increase In Drunk Driving Cases, Mizoram To Become Dry State From April 1

News

WB: Hunger Strike By School Service Commission Aspirants Enters 4th Week; Several Admitted To Hospital After Falling Sick

Legal

“It Is Cold-Blooded Murder,” Says Father Of J&K Principal Who Was “Killed” In Police Custody

x

Stories that deserve attention, delivered to your inbox!

Handpicked, newsworthy stories which deserve the attention of a rational generation.