All You Need To Know About Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups And 'Human Safari' In Andaman & Nicobar Islands

14 March 2017 6:00 AM GMT / Updated : 2020-07-22T19:10:49+05:30
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All You Need To Know About Particularly Vulnerable Tribal Groups And Human Safari In Andaman & Nicobar Islands
Particularly vulnerable Tribal Groups (PTGs) who have been identified in the Andaman & Nicobar Islands. They are:-

  • Great Andamanese of Strait Island
  • Onges of Little Andaman
  • Jarawas of South and Middle Andaman
  • Sentinelese of Sentinel Islands
  • Shompens of Great Nicobar

The tribes of the Andaman Islands – the Jarawa, Great Andamanese, Onge and Sentinelese, Shompens – are believed to have lived in their Indian Ocean home for up to 55,000 years.

They are now vastly outnumbered by several hundred thousand Indians, who have settled on the islands in last 100 years.


What is particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG)?

Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG) (earlier: Primitive tribal group) is a government of India classification created with the purpose of enabling improvement in the conditions of certain communities with particularly low development indices.

The Dhebar Commission (1960-1961) stated that within Scheduled Tribes there existed an inequality in the rate of development. During the fourth Five Year Plan a sub-category was created within Scheduled Tribes to identify groups that considered being at a lower level of development.


The Great Andamanese

These tribal have been rehabilitated in a small island named Strait Island. They were once the largest in population amongst the various tribes inhabiting the Andaman Islands. By 1969, their number had reduced to 19. But today, just 53 Great Andamanese people survive. The Great Andamanese were foragers. Today, they eat modern food items but still go for hunting and gathering. Lately some of them have taken to cultivating vegetables and have also established poultry farms.

The Great Andamanese – as today they are collectively known – were originally ten distinct tribes, including the Jeru, Bea, Bo, Khora and Pucikwar. Each had its own language.

Boa Sr. the last member of the Bo tribe died in 2010. The Bo was the last of the ten tribes to come into contact with the British. It took little more than a century for up to 55,000 years of human history to be wiped out.

They are vulnerable to communicable diseases besides unhealthy drinking habits, acquired after contact with the non-tribal, urban, dominant and advanced communities.


Sentinelese

The Sentinelese tribe is lived on North Sentinel Island for up to 55,000 years and has no contact with the outside world. They are probably the world's only Paleolithic people surviving today. They vigorously reject all contact with outsiders. The Sentinelese is very hostile and never leaves their Island. Very little is known about these hostile tribes.


  • Great Andamanese of Strait Island
  • Onges of Little Andaman
  • Jarawas of South and Middle Andaman
  • Sentinelese of Sentinel Islands
  • Shompens of Great Nicobar

The tribes of the Andaman Islands – the Jarawa, Great Andamanese, Onge and Sentinelese, Shompens – are believed to have lived in their Indian Ocean home for up to 55,000 years.

They are now vastly outnumbered by several hundred thousand Indians, who have settled on the islands in last 100 years.


What is particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG)?

Particularly vulnerable tribal group (PVTG) (earlier: Primitive tribal group) is a government of India classification created with the purpose of enabling improvement in the conditions of certain communities with particularly low development indices.

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