My Story: Six years ago, I Never Thought I Can Walk Again, Today I Want To Win Gold Medal

Image Credit: Humans Of Bombay

The Logical Indian Crew

My Story: 'Six years ago, I Never Thought I Can Walk Again, Today I Want To Win Gold Medal'

This article is more than 1 year old.

At the age of 17, Mumbai resident Harshit Mundra met with a ghastly accident. Beating all the odds he became professional para-cyclist and now wishes to win medals internationally.

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At the age of 17, Mumbai resident Harshit Mundra met with a ghastly accident. His leg had to be amputated. Bed-ridden for months after the surgery, Harshit was terrified when he thought about his future.

"It was a Tuesday–I was biking back from tuition when it happened. I took the right to my house & saw a truck speeding towards me. I tried slowing down & honked frantically, but he was too fast. Within seconds, I was under the truck & its wheel had crushed my ankle. I saw blood oozing out & started screaming. Somehow, I called Papa," Harshit said.

"At the hospital, the doctors said that I had to get my leg amputated. I was terrified. Mom burst into tears–'He's only 17, what will he do in life now?' Papa asked the doctors for another solution, but amputation was the only one. ⁣

The first few weeks post-surgery were hell. I was in bed all day, crying as I thought about college & my friends. I was supposed to live a normal life. I'd often wake up & forget that I didn't have a leg–I'd start walking and fall; Papa would pick me up."

After some time he met para-cycling champion, Aditya Mehta. This inspired him to take upcycling.

"A month later, I was ready to get an artificial leg. I was at the prosthetic centre when I bumped into the Para-cycling champion Aditya Mehta. He told me how he'd won a silver in the Asian championship with a prosthetic leg. He invited me to train, but I didn't feel ready–I could barely walk. I told him that I'd get back to him. ⁣

After that, I focused on walking again. I started physiotherapy. At times, I'd fall & panic, but I didn't give up; Aditya's words kept me going. Finally, after 2 months, I sent him a video of me walking & said, 'I'm ready to be a para-cyclist.' ⁣

In no time, I was off to Hyderabad to join his team. My parents were so excited for me. After three months of training, I went on my first road trip with the team–we cycled from Bangalore to Hyderabad. Some days, we rode for 12 hours! My knees would hurt & I'd lose balance but I was determined. For 2 years, we took trips; the adrenaline rush was something else! ⁣

In 2018, I became the youngest member of the Indian para-cycling team to ride from Shimla to Manali. It was the world's 2nd most dangerous road, but I was on top of the world!"

Harshit is 23 now is pursuing engineering & para-cycling and wants to compete in international tournaments. "I have a clear vision–I want to win gold internationally. Six years ago, I thought I'd never walk, let alone para-cycle. So just know that if a one-legged man can do it, you can do anything!"

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"It was a Tuesday–I was biking back from tuitions when it happened. I took the right to my house & saw a truck speeding towards me. I tried slowing down & honked frantically, but he was too fast. Within seconds, I was under the truck & its wheel had crushed my ankle. I saw blood oozing out & started screaming. Somehow, I called Papa. ⁣ At the hospital, the doctors said that I had to get my leg amputated. I was terrified. Mom burst into tears–'He's only 17, what will he do in life now?' Papa asked the doctors for another solution, but amputation was the only one. ⁣ The first few weeks post surgery were hell. I was in bed all day, crying as I thought about college & my friends. I was supposed to live a normal life. I'd often wake up & forget that I didn't have a leg–I'd start walking and fall; Papa would pick me up. ⁣ A month later, I was ready to get an artificial leg. I was at the prosthetic centre when I bumped into the Paracycling champion Aditya Mehta. He told me how he'd won a silver in the Asian championship with a prosthetic leg. He invited me to train, but I didn't feel ready–I could barely walk. I told him that I'd get back to him. ⁣ After that, I focused on walking again. I started physiotherapy. At times, I'd fall & panic, but I didn't give up; Aditya's words kept me going. Finally after 2 months, I sent him a video of me walking & said, 'I'm ready to be a paracyclist.' ⁣ In no time, I was off to Hyderabad to join his team. My parents were so excited for me. After 3 months of training, I went on my first road trip with the team–we cycled from Bangalore to Hyderabad. Some days, we rode for 12 hours! My knees would hurt & I'd lose balance but I was determined. For 2 years, we took trips; the adrenaline rush was something else! ⁣ In 2018, I became the youngest member of the Indian paracycling team to ride from Shimla to Manali. It was the world's 2nd most dangerous road, but I was on top of the world!⁣ I'm 23 now & I'm juggling engineering & para cycling. I have a clear vision–I want to win gold internationally. 6 years ago, I thought I'd never walk, let alone paracycle. So just know that if a one-legged man can do it, you can do anything!"

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Also Read: My Story: "I Am One Of Midnights Children, 1947 Born, And As Old As Independent India"

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Writer : Humans Of Bombay
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Creatives : Abhishek M

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