Humanising HIV+, Asias First All-HIV+ Cafe Embraces One And All In Kolkata

Image Credit: Twitter/ ANI

The Logical Indian Crew

Humanising HIV+, Asia's First All-HIV+ Cafe Embraces One And All In Kolkata

The main aim of the cafe is to not only spread awareness about HIV and about the people who have been suffering from HIV but also to provide employment to the people.

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People who have HIV/AIDS are often treated as outcasts in society. However, Kolkata-based Dr Kallol Ghosh wanted to bust these myths and regressive ideas; therefore, he started 'Cafe Positive', in which the entire team comprises only HIV positive staff. Dr Ghosh is a child activist who also dreamt of creating an initiative for people who have HIV after 18 years of age. The cafe acts as a platform for the patients to serve food and drinks to their customers. Moreover, Dr Ghosh and his company plan of opening 30 such restaurants across the length and breadth of India, and over 800 people are under training for the same.

Staff Was Abandoned By Their Families

News18 reported Dr Ghosh saying, "They are just like everyone else and have every right to be respected and earn money". When customers come to the cafe, some know about the staff's condition while the others do not. However, the team always informs the customers about them being HIV+ before taking up any orders. A staff member from the cafe explained that while some people do not react positively, others act as if HIV is just human. The cafe is well-known for its aromatic coffee and a busy environment, usually filled with professionals, college students and young adults. All the people working in the cafe were abandoned by their families when they were found to be HIV+.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has claimed that HIV has claimed more than 36.3 million lives, thereby remaining a significant public health issue. Even though is no cure for viral infection yet, the increasing access to measures for preventing HIV and early diagnosis have made it a manageable chronic health condition.

Also Read: The 'Stain' Of Menstrual Myths That Continue To Haunt Indian Women

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Writer : Ratika Rana
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Editor : Ankita Singh
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Creatives : Ratika Rana