Farmers Start 'Informal School' For Local Slum Children At Singhu Border Protest Site

A group of farmers from Punjab's Anandpur Sahib has started an "informal school" in a makeshift tent at the Singhu Border for local slum children.

Delhi   |   18 Dec 2020 3:07 AM GMT
Writer : Ankita Singh | Editor : Prateek Gautam | Creatives : Rajath
Farmers Start Informal School For Local Slum Children At Singhu Border Protest Site

Image Credits: The Indian Express

A group of farmers from Punjab's Anandpur Sahib has started an "informal school" in a makeshift tent at the Singhu Border for local slum children.

Started by writer Bir Singh and advocate Dinesh Chaddha, the temporary school that started on Monday is part of the multiple 'sewa' practices being offered at the protest site.

As the agitated farmers have been continuing protests for more than two weeks now, the protesters have found various ways to help each other and those living around the protest site, be it through community kitchens, medical services, libraries, or this temporary school.

The volunteers refer to everything as 'sewa'. As the volunteers at the protest site saw so many children from neighbouring slums roaming around for food, they thought about beneficially engaging them.

Satnam Singh, a volunteer at the protest site, shared that there are many educated individuals among the farmers, who hold Bachelor's or PhD degrees and have been teaching the children.

The temporary school which runs in a makeshift tent already has 60-70 children across different age groups, who come there every day to read, write, draw and listen to stories.

Satnam informs that initially, the kids had to be encouraged to come and study here by giving them fruit juice and snacks.

Although, over the last two days, the children have been coming on their own, and have even brought their friends too.

Satnam says that the teachers inquire what class are they studying in and teach accordingly. Satnam also said that they have arranged for a similar facility to teach children at the Tikri protest site as well.

As the local children talk in Hindi, they have been provided with storybooks in the Hindi language itself.

The tent is used in the evenings, to recreate a tradition, "Sanjhi Sath", where the villagers gather to listen to their elders' advice.

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Ankita Singh

Ankita Singh

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A literature lover who likes delving deeper into a wide range of societal issues and expresses her opinions about the same. Keeps looking for best-read recommendations while enjoying her coffee and tea.

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