Impeccable Feat! Wheelchair-Bound Paralysed Man Conquers Africas Highest Mountain At 5,895 Metre Altitude

Image Credit- Twitter @SIA_Mountain

The Logical Indian Crew

Impeccable Feat! Wheelchair-Bound Paralysed Man Conquers Africa's Highest Mountain At 5,895 Metre Altitude

As per reports, only 65% of climbers are able to complete the Kilimanjaro summit. Experts and guides accompanied Martin Hibbert while climbing the mountain in his wheelchair.

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It takes a moment for a life to change forever; five years ago, this man was told that he wouldn't be able to walk, but today he has scaled a mountain. Martin Hibbert suffered paralysis after the Manchester Arena bombing, but now, with determination, he has conquered the summit of Africa's highest mountain at 5,895-metre-hight in his wheelchair.

The 45-year-old accomplished climbing Mount Kilimanjaro's peak in Tanzania with his support team of helpers and local guides. He broke into singing and dancing as he reached the cliff's highest point to become the second paralysed person to achieve this feat.

Survived Bomb Attack

Five years ago last month, Hibbert and his daughter Eve, then aged 14, were 5 metres away from a suicide bomber identified as Salman Abedi when he exploded his device leaving 22 dead and hundreds impaired.

He sustained a severed spinal cord from shrapnel in the bombing and was left paralysed from the waist down.

According to The Guardian, he launched this mission to scale Mt Kilimanjaro as he wanted to "move mountains" for specially-abled people. His main aim is to raise funds for Spinal Injuries Association and has already managed to raise around half of the £1 million target of donations to fund the association.

Video From The Summit

In a video recorded from the summit, Hibbert could be heard saying, "Here, we are on the top of Kilimanjaro. Five years ago, I was in the hospital, hardly able to move. And here I am, five years later on the top of Kilimanjaro, amazing feeling. Dream, believe, achieve is something I say to people… Second paralysed person to do this, so proud."

In another social media post, he mentioned that he attended altitude training for 12 weeks.

According to BBC, only 65 per cent of climbers are able to complete the Kilimanjaro summit. Experts and guides accompanied the man while he was climbing the mountain. Further, close friends and the medical team ensured that he stayed healthy.

Also Read: Boat Library For Children Set Up In Odisha's Bhitarkanika National Forest, Aims To Encourage Environment Conservation

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Writer : Shiva Chaudhary
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Editor : Snehadri Sarkar
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Creatives : Shiva Chaudhary