Madhya Pradesh: US Radio Station To Feature ASHA Worker For Educating Villagers Through Paintings

Image Credits: The New Indian Express

The Logical Indian Crew

Madhya Pradesh: US Radio Station To Feature ASHA Worker For Educating Villagers Through Paintings

This article is more than 1 year old.

Ranjana Dwivedi will be the sole representative from India to be featured in the National Public Radio's (NPR) documentary. It features 19 women from across the globe who shared their challenges and the measures taken to overcome them amid the on-going coronavirus outbreak.

  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo
  • Whatsapp
  • Telegram
  • Linkedin
  • Print
  • koo

An ASHA (Accredited Social Health Activist) health worker from Madhya Pradesh's Rewa has been chosen to be the sole representative from India to be featured in the National Public Radio's (NPR) documentary.

The documentary features 19 women from across the globe who share the challenges they faced amid the on-going coronavirus pandemic and the measures taken by them to overcome those challenges.

National Public Radio, an American privately and publicly funded non-profit media organisation, broadcasts stories on-air and reportedly has over 25 million listeners each week.

Ranjana Dwivedi, the health worker, has been on a mission to create awareness on basic healthcare facilities in the remotest areas of Gurguda village in the Jawa block of Rewa district for over ten years now.

Fondly called Asha didi, Ranjana has been creative with her ways to educate the masses amid the pandemic. She understood that the villagers are mostly illiterate and not open to changes unless they are provided with easy to understand and relatable information.

Taking the grassroots level challenges into consideration, the ASHA worker started educating the residents via paintings drawn by her and her son on various health programs of the government, particularly the immunization program.

According to The New Indian Express, Ranjana had to face tough times when she initially started working. She had to go through days when women used to run away and hide from her, during immunization drives which were being conducted during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

But her consistent efforts and the paintings helped her with making people aware of the coronavirus precautions and also to implement in their everyday lives.

"I twice fell in the river, but it has failed to jolt my duty and commitment to the villagers," said Ranjana, while recalling incidents where she had to cross the Tamas river in a boat to reach the other side of the village.

Also Read: Kerala Provides Jobs To Over 19,000 Women Through Kudumbashree Programme

Contributors Suggest Correction
Writer : Palak Agrawal
,
Editor : Prateek Gautam
,
Creatives : Vijay S Hegde

Must Reads