Acche Din Aayenge Sir: This Young Graduate Working As Gas Delivery Agent Is Reinstilling Hopes Of Better Tomorrow

Image Credit: LinkedIn

The Logical Indian Crew

'Acche Din Aayenge Sir': This Young Graduate Working As Gas Delivery Agent Is Reinstilling Hopes Of Better Tomorrow

A LinkedIn post about a science graduate working as a gas delivery agent in Uttar Pradesh has brought about conversations about skills vs opportunities and the "acche din" that were promised to the youth of the country.

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Rajesh Singh, founder and director of a private company based in Gurgaon, had recently posted a LinkedIn story about an agent who delivers gas cylinders to his locality. It gave the users a glimpse of the agent's life and the kind of odd jobs that many skilled graduates turn to in the country.

The optimistic agent's story has received over 37,000 likes and has been shared across the platform by over 500 users. The comments section under the post, however, provides food for thought about the job environment that exists and the ground reality of many youths in the country.

Meeting Day's End With Less Than 4,000 Per Month

The post begins with Singh narrating that he was shaken to realise that his delivery agent could converse in English.

Within Indian society, many are still rooted in the presumption that those involved in odd jobs or earning daily wages would not be well-versed in the foreign tongue. Such jobs are often stereotypically associated with those who may not have received much education or are less privileged.

This would probably be the reason why Singh was taken aback to have met an agent fluent in English to be delivering gas cylinders from door-to-door. Having struck a conversation with the youngster, Singh understood that the 24-year-old Sandeep Yadav from Sultanpur is a science graduate. On a day-to-day basis, Yadav delivers about 25 to 30 cylinders and earns a monthly income of 12,000.

On being asked about why he had opted for such a job after his graduation, Yadav said that this was the only job he could manage to secure. It paid him a decent amount of money, through which he could support his ageing parents back in his village. From the 12,000 that he earns monthly, around 8,000 goes back home, and he survives on the remaining 4,000.

Living with 20 other guys from the town, he has been able to manage and meet the day's end even with a minimal salary. This one statement sheds light on the many youths in the country who have deviated to different kinds of jobs despite having secured multiple degrees because of the lack of opportunities available to them.

Despite the kind of conditions he has had to survive in, the optimistic delivery agent ended the conversation with a positive note saying, "Acche din aayenge, sir," (better days are ahead".

Responses From Other Users

Among the 1,000+ comments that were poured in, there were many who came forward with support and asked for the agent's contact to provide him with opportunities. They proposed that since he is a science graduate, there would be multiple spaces that would be ready to train and accommodate him.

A user Radesh Rangarajan commented that it is "Our moral responsibility to show appreciation in the form of generous tipping when we can afford it." He also added that despite the government's trickle-down support being well-intentioned, those mainly benefitting from it are government employees.

In response to the tipping nature, another user argued that the agents would be receiving sufficient additional payment from the gas agencies. Presenting ideal calculations, they deduced that an agent would earn a total of around ₹25,000 through this means. Commenting in response to this, another user spoke of how none of the shops in India function in the manner in which they claim to do as per the accounts.

They added that many agents are often scammed out of their rightful income by both small to big industries. Validating this idea, a user named Surabhi Joshi said that it is a "story similar to many in the country right now who have the skills and capability but are not at the right place."

Stories similar to that of Yadav's have often been posted on the online platform, and it has initiated a much-needed dialogue on the efforts made by the country and individuals to provide better opportunities for everyone. This is what makes it necessary for stories like his to come out in the mainstream.

Also Read: Meet The Pakistani Woman Food Delivery Agent Who Is Inspiring Others With Her Story

Contributors Suggest Correction
Writer : Laxmi Mohan Kumar
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Editor : Shiva Chaudhary
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Creatives : Laxmi Mohan Kumar