Meet Xenobots, Worlds First Living Robots That Can Reproduce

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The Logical Indian Crew

Meet Xenobots, World's First Living Robots That Can Reproduce

Engineered by computers and created from the stem cell of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis, from where its name is originally derived, were first introduced in 2020 to the world.

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In what can be described as a landmark moment for Artificial Intelligence (IA), the first living robots in the world have now learned how to self-replicate, as per the scientists who developed them.

Meet The Xenobots!

Engineered by computers and created from the stem cell of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis, from where its name is originally derived, were first introduced in 2020 to the world. Back then, scientists had stated that the organisms could survive for weeks without food and also could self-healing, as per CNN report.

However, experts have revealed that these blob-like organisms also have the ability to reproduce in an "entirely new" fashion, scientists at the University of Vermont, Tufts University, and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University said in an official release on November 29.

Researchers have also found that xenobots, which are 0.4 inches wide, also have the ability to "gather hundreds" of single cells and "assemble baby" organisms in their mouths. This then helps to become new functional xenobots within days, according to the release.

A Remarkable Breakthrough In Biotech

Josh Bongard from the University of Vermont stated that xenobots made from 3,000 cells had the ability to replicate using "kinetic replication", a procedure which has never been observed before, however, widely renowned to happen at the molecular level.

"We are working to understand this property: replication. The world and technologies are rapidly changing. It's important, for society as a whole, that we study and understand how this works,"

Bongard further stated in the release, while also emphasising the need to have a better understanding of this kind of reproducing biotechnology.

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Writer : Snehadri Sarkar
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Editor : Madhusree Goswami
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Creatives : Snehadri Sarkar