Syrian Refugee Children Make Clothes For British Shoppers

The Logical Indian

October 28th, 2016 / 1:00 AM

Syrian Refugees Children Making Clothes

Source:bbc | Image Courtesy:ibtimes

Syrian Refugees Children Making Clothes

In an undercover investigation conducted by BBC Panorama, it was found that Syrian refugee children have been making clothes for British shoppers. The kids were found working in factories in Turkey.

Brands like Marks and Spencer, Zara and Mango jeans have claimed that they monitor their supply chains and do not tolerate the exploitation of refugees or children.


Investigation Reports
It was found seven Syrians working in one of the British retailer’s main factories. They earn little more than a pound an hour. One of the refugees told that they are badly treated in the factory, and when something happens to them, they are thrown like a piece of cloth.

Another 15-year-old worker informed that he works more than 12 hours a day ironing clothes. There are many other refugees who have no work permits, and many of them work illegally in the garment industry.

“They speak of pitiful wages and terrible working conditions. They know they are being exploited, but they know that refugees can do nothing about it,” says Panorama reporter Darragh Macintyre, as reported by BBC.

7 to 8-year-old children sew boxer shorts. Kids do not go to school as they get exhausted from working 60 hours a week.

In another Istanbul factory, Syrian adults work alongside Turkish children who are as young as 10.


What Has Iconic Brands To Say?
According to the spokesperson of Marks and Spencer, the program’s findings are extremely serious and unacceptable to M&S. They are also said to be offering permanent legal employment to any Syrians who were employed in the factory. They do not tolerate such breaches of these principles, and they would do anything to ensure that it does not happen again.

Another spokeswoman of Mango brand said that Mango has zero tolerance towards the practices described in the ‘Panorama’.

“It’s a subject we take incredibly seriously. But it would be wrong for us to comment on reporting we haven’t seen.” said an ASOS spokeswoman.

ASOS says the children will be financially supported so they can return to school and the adult refugees will be paid a wage until they have been found legal work.


Past Incidents
A month back, owner of Zara, Amancio Ortega was declared as the richest person. His bank balance has overtaken Microsoft founder Bill Gates fortune. But the recent findings by Panorama has cleared the picture of how innocent kids are being driven in the shackles of child labor and brands like Zara, Mango Jeans and Marks and Spencer are themselves employing kids to work for them.


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