Maharashtra And Rajasthan Have Highest Cost For Electricity, Not Punjab; AAP Makes False Claim

AAP spokesperson Raghav Chadha tweeted a video saying, "Punjab is the costliest state in terms of electricity in the country." The claim is false.

Punjab   |   3 July 2021 2:39 PM GMT
Writer : Sreya Mullick | Editor : Bharat Nayak | Creatives : Sreya Mullick
Maharashtra And Rajasthan Have Highest Cost For Electricity, Not Punjab; AAP Makes False Claim

Picture Credits: Facebook, The Statesman

Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) is preparing to fight Punjab state elections with the promise of free electricity to its citizens. AAP National Spokesperson Raghav Chadha tweeted on 28th June 2021, comparing the electricity costs of Punjab and Delhi, trying to prove that Punjab Government is looting common people.

In the tweet, he attached a video where he can be heard saying, "The people of Punjab are getting the costliest electricity in the country in spite of the fact that the state produces its own electricity."

Following this, Bhagwant Mann also posted a video on the @AAPPunjab handle, where he said, "Shiromani Akali Dal Government led by Captain Amarinder Singh is looting the people by making electricity costly. Now, the situation is such that in the entire country, power is most expensive in Punjab."

Claim:

Punjab has the highest electricity cost in India.

Fact Check:

According to Alliance for an Energy-Efficient Economic (AEEE) analysis, the monthly electricity charges are highest in Maharashtra, not in Punjab.


A report by Central Electricity Authority(CEA), 2019 has divided the Power tariff for domestic purposes into different categories - a load of 1 Kilowatt (100 units a month), 2 Kilowatt (200 units a month), and upto 10 Kilowatt (1000 units a month).

The report shows for a domestic usage of power load of 1 kW, Rajasthan is the most expensive as the cost is Rs 7.38 per kWh where Punjab's rate is Rs. 5.83 per kWh. The power charge of Mumbai-Maharashtra for a load of 2 kW and consumption of upto 200 units is Rs 7.76 per kWh if Reliance supplies the electricity. In this case, Punjab costs Rs 6.73 per kWh for a 2 kW load and usage of 200 units. And Tata Powers in Mumbai charges between Rs 9.38 per kWh to Rs 13.39 per kWh to use more than 200 units and upto 1,000 units.


Central Electricity Regulatory Commission (CERC) has published another report on average power purchase cost in March 2021. Where average power purchase cost is higher in Andaman & Nicobar Islands with Rs 18.45 per unit and Odisha's is the lowest with Rs 2.46 per unit, and Punjab has an average cost of Rs 3.65 per unit.

Punjab State Electricity Regulatory Commission has assessed the net aggregate revenue requirement of the state-owned Punjab state power corporation by reducing per unit tariff for domestic consumers with loads upto 2kW and consumption slabs of 0 to 100 units and 101 to 300 units by Rs1 and 50 paise, effective from June 1, 2021, to March 2022.

This means, for the domestic supply of upto 2kW and consumption of upto 100 units, the tariff will be Rs.3.49 per kWh.


Conclusion:

The claim made by AAP leaders that Punjab has the highest electricity price is false.

FactChecker has already debunked this claim.

If you have any news that you believe needs to be fact-checked, please email us at factcheck@thelogicalindian.com or WhatsApp at 6364000343.

Also Read: Picture Of Plastic-Choked River In Manila, Philippines Falsely Shared As Mithi River, Mumbai

Claim Review :  Punjab has the highest Electricity cost in India
Claimed By :  AAP leaders
Fact Check :  False
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Sreya Mullick

Sreya Mullick

Remote Intern

Sreya is a Journalism postgraduate who loves writing and editing report and deliver them to the readers.

Bharat Nayak

Bharat Nayak

Founding Editor - Special Project

As the founding editor, Bharat had been heading the newsroom during the formation years of the organization and worked towards editorial policies, conceptualizing and designing campaign strategies and collaborations. He believes that through the use of digital media, one could engage the millennial's in rational conversations about pertinent social issues, provoking them to think and bring a behavioral change accordingly.

Sreya Mullick

Sreya Mullick

Remote Intern

Sreya is a Journalism postgraduate who loves writing and editing report and deliver them to the readers.

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